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Research has revolutionised the lives of people with asthma

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Working with your local Asthma Foundation

Let's Talk Asthma

People often treat their asthma as a short-term condition that comes and goes. But asthma is a chronic condition that’s always there, even when you don’t have symptoms.

Follow our asthma checklist (PDF 464.8KB) to ensure you’re taking the right steps to live well with asthma.

Visit your doctor for an asthma review 

With your doctor:

  • assess your current level of asthma control 
  • make sure you are on the right medicines to manage your asthma (e.g. a preventer)
  • check your inhaler technique  
  • ensure your Asthma Action Plan is up-to-date so you can recognise and manage worsening asthma symptoms and when to seek emergency care
  • ask any questions

Take the Asthma Control Test

If you have experienced any of the following in the last four weeks

  • daytime asthma symptoms more than 2 days per week
  • need for reliever more than 2 days per week
  • any limitation on activities due to asthma symptoms
  • any asthma symptoms during the night or on waking

your asthma could be under better control and might be holding you back. Take the Asthma Control Test to get your asthma score and to check your level of asthma control.

Preventer – every day when well

Most adults with asthma should have a preventer medication. The key to keeping well with asthma is taking a daily preventer, even when you feel well. Regular use of your preventer makes the airways less sensitive and will reduce your symptoms, reduce likelihood of reacting to triggers and need for your blue/grey reliever medication.

Check your device technique

Up to 90% of people are thought to use their inhalers incorrectly, which means the dose of medicine isn’t getting into the lungs. Ask your doctor or pharmacist to check you are using your inhaler medication device correctly. Regular checks to ensure your inhaler technique is correct can improve asthma control and lung function.

Get a written Asthma Action Plan

With your doctor, develop a written Asthma Action Plan. Research shows that using an Asthma Action Plan can help to reduce hospitalisations, improve lung function and reduce the number of days off work and school.

Follow a written asthma action plan for:

  • better controlled asthma
  • fewer asthma attacks
  • fewer days off work or school
  • reduced reliever medication use
  • fewer hospital visits.

Download a copy of the asthma checklist here (PDF 464.8KB).

For more asthma information and support call 1800 ASTHMA Helpline (1800 278 462)

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This website is a collaboration between Asthma Australia and Asthma Foundations ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, VIC, WA, TAS and SA