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Research has revolutionised the lives of people with asthma

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  • Add-on medication - If you have severe asthma, sometimes other types of medication are used together with a preventer and a reliever to help control the symptoms of asthma. These ‘add-on’ medications are used in addition to a preventer medicine to improve your lung function and reduce asthma flare-ups.
  • Combination Preventer - Combination preventers contain two medicines within the one inhaler, an inhaled corticosteroid to reduce the inflammation, sensitivity and excess mucus in the airways to reduce your symptoms and flare-ups and reduce the likelihood of reacting to triggers, together with a long-acting bronchodilator to relax tight airway muscles for up to 12 hours.
  • High ICS dose level definitions - Lists the high daily dose levels for both children and adults for a range of inhaled corticosteroids
  • Oral Corticosteroids - People with asthma are sometimes prescribed short courses of oral corticosteroid tablets (such as prednisolone) to help get their asthma under control during a flare-up. This is a powerful anti-inflammatory medicine which helps by quickly reducing the inflammation in your lungs. It is much stronger than the inhaled corticosteroid which is in your preventer inhaler.
  • Preventer - Preventers contain an inhaled corticosteroid (anti-inflammatory) to reduce the inflammation, sensitivity and excess mucus in the airways; this will reduce your symptoms and flare-ups and reduce the likelihood of reacting to triggers.
  • Reliever - Everyone with asthma should have a reliever medication. Relievers are fast acting medication that give quick relief of asthma symptoms. They open the airways quickly by relaxing the airway muscles. Using your reliever more than two days per week is a sign of uncontrolled asthma.
  • What treatments are used for severe asthma? - People with severe asthma will use many of the same medicines used by people with more mild to moderate asthma (preventers and relievers). However, people with severe asthma do not respond as well to these commonly prescribed asthma treatments, and often require additional treatment options.

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